EXPLORE
EXPLORE    FEATURES    ABOUT   
Add or Edit your lists and challenges
Who you follow and who follows you
EXPLORE    FEATURES    ABOUT   
 
 
 
The most popular Man Made destinations that members of the Day Zero community have added to their lists!
 
Filter by:  Want To Do    Done 
 
1. Times Square NEW YORK
#1
Times Square is a major commercial intersection in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, at the junction of Broadway and Seventh Avenue and stretching from West 42nd to West 47th Streets. The extended Times Square area, also called the Theatre District, consists of the blocks between Sixth and Eighth Avenues from east to west, and West 40th and West 53rd Streets from south to north, making up the western part of the commercial area of Midtown Manhattan.
2. The Statue of Liberty NEW YORK
#2
The Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, designed by Frédéric Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886. The statue, a gift to the United States from the people of France, is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata (a tablet evoking the law) upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence.
3. Empire State Building NEW YORK
#3
The Empire State Building is a 102-story landmark Art Deco skyscraper in New York City at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. Its name is derived from the nickname for New York, The Empire State. It stood as the world's tallest building for more than 40 years, from its completion in 1931 until construction of the World Trade Center's North Tower was completed in 1972.
4. Golden Gate Bridge CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO
#4
The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay into the Pacific Ocean. As part of both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1, it connects the city of San Francisco on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula to Marin County.
#5
The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States. Located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C. , the house was designed by Irish-born James Hoban, and built between 1792 and 1800 of white-painted Aquia sandstone in the Neoclassical style. It has been the residence of every U.S. President since John Adams.
6. Mount Rushmore SOUTH DAKOTA
#6
Mount Rushmore National Memorial is a sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore near Keystone, South Dakota, in the United States. Sculpted by Gutzon Borglum and later by his son Lincoln Borglum, Mount Rushmore features 60-foot (18 m) sculptures of the heads of former United States presidents (in order from left to right) George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln.
#7
Alcatraz Island is an island located in the San Francisco Bay, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) offshore from San Francisco, California. Often referred to as The Rock, the small island early-on served as a lighthouse, a military fortification, a military prison, and a Federal Bureau of Prisons federal prison until 1963. Later, in 1972, Alcatraz became a national recreation area and received landmarking designations in 1976 and 1986.
8. Ellis Island NEW YORK
#8
Ellis Island in New York Harbor was the gateway for millions of immigrants to the United States as the site of the nation's busiest immigrant inspection station from 1892 to 1954. Prior to that, the much smaller original island was the site of Fort Gibson and later a naval magazine. The island was greatly expanded with landfill between 1892 and 1934.
9. Fallingwater PENNSYLVANIA
#9
Fallingwater or Kaufmann Residence is a house designed by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1935 in rural southwestern Pennsylvania, 50 miles southeast of Pittsburgh. The home was built partly over a waterfall on Bear Run in the Mill Run section of Stewart Township, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, in the Laurel Highlands of the Allegheny Mountains.
RELATED GOALS:
10. The Lincoln Memorial UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, WASHINGTON, D.C.
#10
The Lincoln Memorial is an American memorial built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. and was dedicated on May 30, 1922. The architect was Henry Bacon, the sculptor of the main statue was Daniel Chester French, and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. It is one of several monuments built to honor an American president.
11. Dole Plantation Maze HAWAII
#11
In 2008, Dole Plantation’s giant Pineapple Garden Maze was declared the world’s largest maze. The maze stretches over three acres and includes nearly two and one-half miles of paths crafted from 14,000 colorful Hawaiian plants. Walk through the flora of the islands as you seek out eight secret stations that each lead you closer to the mystery at the heart of this larger-than-life labyrinth, one of only a handful of permanent botanical mazes in America.
12. The Brooklyn Bridge NEW YORK
#12
The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the oldest suspension bridges in the United States. Completed in 1883, it connects the New York City boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn by spanning the East River. With a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m), it was the longest suspension bridge in the world from its opening until 1903, and the first steel-wire suspension bridge.
13. The Hollywood sign CALIFORNIA
#13
The Hollywood Sign is a famous landmark in the Hollywood Hills area of Mount Lee, Santa Monica Mountains, in Los Angeles, California. The iconic sign spells out the name of the area in Convert/LoffAoffDbSmid and Convert/LoffAoffDbSmid white letters. It was created as an advertisement in 1923, but garnered increasing recognition after the sign was left up.
14. Hoover Dam NEVADA
#14
Hoover Dam, once known as Boulder Dam, is a concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, on the border between the US states of Arizona and Nevada. It was constructed between 1931 and 1936, and was dedicated on September 30, 1935, by President Franklin Roosevelt. Its construction was the result of a massive effort involving thousands of workers, and cost over one hundred lives.
15. Vietnam Veterans Memorial UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, WASHINGTON, D.C.
#15
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a national memorial in Washington, D.C. It honors U.S. service members of the U.S. armed forces who fought in the Vietnam War, service members who died in service in Vietnam/South East Asia, and those service members who were unaccounted for (Missing In Action) during the War. Its construction and related issues have been the source of controversies, some of which have resulted in additions to the memorial complex.
16. The Fountains at Bellagio NEVADA
#16
Bellagio is a luxury, AAA Five Diamond award winning hotel and casino located on the Las Vegas Strip in the Paradise area of unincorporated Clark County, Nevada, USA and a member of The Leading Hotels of the World. It is owned by MGM Resorts International and was built on the site of the demolished Dunes hotel and casino. The resort serves as the seat of the corporate headquarters for MGM Resorts International and is considered the main flagship resort of the gaming company.
17. The National September 11 Memorial NEW YORK
#17
The National September 11 Memorial & Museum (branded as 9/11 Memorial and 9/11 Memorial Museum) is the principal memorial and museum commemorating the September 11 attacks of 2001. The memorial is located at the World Trade Center site, on the former location of the Twin Towers destroyed during the attacks. The World Trade Center Memorial Foundation was renamed the National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center in 2007.
18. Graceland TENNESSEE
#18
Graceland is a large white-columned mansion and 13.8-acre estate that was home to Elvis Presley in Memphis, Tennessee. It is located at 3764 Elvis Presley Boulevard in the vast Whitehaven community about 9 miles (14.5 km) from Downtown and less than four miles (6 km) north of the Mississippi border. It currently serves as a museum. It was opened to the public on June 7, 1982.
19. The Space Needle WASHINGTON
#19
The Space Needle is a tower in Seattle, Washington and is a major landmark of the Pacific Northwest region of the United States and a symbol of Seattle. Located at the Seattle Center, it was built for the 1962 World's Fair, during which time nearly 20,000 people a day used the elevators, with over 2.3 million visitors in all for the World Fair. The Space Needle is 605 feet (184 m) high at its highest point and 138 feet (42 m) wide at its widest point and weighs 9,550 tons.
20. The Winchester Mystery House CALIFORNIA
#20
The Winchester Mystery House is a well-known California mansion that was under construction continuously for 38 years, and is reported to be haunted. It once was the personal residence of Sarah Winchester, the widow of gun magnate William Wirt Winchester, but is now a tourist attraction.
21. Cloud Gate ILLINOIS
#21
Cloud Gate, a public sculpture by Indian-born British artist Anish Kapoor, is the centerpiece of the AT&T Plaza in Millennium Park within the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois, United States. The sculpture and AT&T Plaza are located on top of Park Grill, between the Chase Promenade and McCormick Tribune Plaza & Ice Rink. Constructed between 2004 and 2006, the sculpture is nicknamed "The Bean" because of its bean-like shape.
22. Grand Central Station NEW YORK
#22
Grand Central Terminal (GCT)—colloquially called Grand Central Station, or shortened to simply Grand Central—is a commuter rail terminal station at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States. Built by and named for the New York Central Railroad in the heyday of American long-distance passenger trains, it is the largest train station in the world by number of platforms: 44, with 67 tracks along them.
23. The Gateway Arch in St. Louis MISSOURI
#23
The Gateway Arch, also known as the Gateway to the West, is part of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in St. Louis, Missouri. It is 630 feet (192 m) wide at its base and stands 630 feet (192 m) tall, making it the tallest monument in the United States, and the tallest habitable structure in the state. It was designed by architect Eero Saarinen and structural engineer Hannskarl Bandel in 1947. Construction started on February 12, 1963, and ended on October 28, 1965, costing $13 million.
24. The Seattle Central Library WASHINGTON
#24
The Seattle Central Library is the flagship library of the Seattle Public Library system. The 11-story (185 feet or 56 meters high) glass and steel building in downtown Seattle, Washington was opened to the public on Sunday, May 23, 2004. Rem Koolhaas and Joshua Prince-Ramus of OMA/REX were the principal architects and Hoffman Construction Company of Portland, Oregon, was the general contractor.
25. The USS Arizona National Memorial HAWAII
#25
The USS Arizona Memorial, located at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, Hawai?i, marks the resting place of 1,102 of the 1,177 sailors killed on the USS Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 by Japanese imperial forces and commemorates the events of that day. The attack on Pearl Harbor and the island of O?ahu was the action that led to United States involvement in World War II. The memorial, dedicated in 1962, is visited by more than one million people annually.
26. Arlington National Cemetery VIRGINIA
#26
Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington County, Virginia, is a military cemetery in the United States of America, established during the American Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Confederate general Robert E. Lee's wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a great grand-daughter of Martha Washington. The cemetery is situated directly across the Potomac River from the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. , and near The Pentagon.
27. The Jack Daniel’s Distillery TENNESSEE
#27
Jack Daniel's is a brand of Tennessee whiskey that is among the world's best-selling liquors and is known for its square bottles and black label. It is produced in Lynchburg, Tennessee by Jack Daniel Distillery, which has been owned by the Brown-Forman Corporation since 1956. Despite the operational distillery, Jack Daniel's home county of Moore is a dry county.
28. Willis Tower ILLINOIS
#28
Willis Tower, formerly named Sears Tower, is a 108-story, 1451-foot (442 m) skyscraper in Chicago, Illinois. At the time of its completion in 1974, it was the tallest building in the world, surpassing the World Trade Center towers in New York, and it held this rank for nearly 25 years. The Willis Tower is the tallest building in the United States and the fifth-tallest freestanding structure in the world, as well as the fifth tallest building in the world to the roof.
29. Biltmore Estate NORTH CAROLINA
#29
Biltmore House is a Châteauesque-styled mansion in Asheville, North Carolina, built by George Washington Vanderbilt II between 1889 and 1895. It is the largest privately-owned home in the United States, at 135,000 square feet (12,500 m) (although publications claim 175,000 square feet) and featuring 250 rooms.
30. The Menil Collection TEXAS
#30
The Menil Collection, located in Houston, Texas, United States, refers either to a museum that houses the private art collection of founders John de Ménil and Dominique de Ménil, or to the collection itself. Dominique was an heir to the Schlumberger oil-drilling fortune, and John was an executive of that company.
31. The O.K. Corral in Tombstone ARIZONA
#31
The O.K. Corral (in which "O.K." stands for "Old Kindersley") was originally a small horse corral located in the 19th century boomtown city of Tombstone in the Territory of Arizona, an organized incorporated territory of the United States. It is most famously associated with the "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral", which is somewhat of a misnomer. According to American Old West historians, the gunfight actually took place in a vacant lot next to Camillus Fly's photography studio, six doors down Fremont Street from an alleyway that cut through the block and served as an informal rear entrance to the corral. In this context, a more appropriate name for the event would be "Gunfight near the O.K. Corral".
32. Hearst Castle CALIFORNIA
#32
Hearst Castle is a National Historic Landmark mansion located on the Central Coast of California, United States. It was designed by architect Julia Morgan between 1919 and 1947 for newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, who died in 1951. In 1957, the Hearst Corporation donated the property to the state of California. Since that time it has been maintained as a state historic park where the estate, and its considerable collection of art and antiques, is open for public tours.
33. Temple Square in Salt Lake City UTAH
#33
Temple Square is a ten acre (40,000 m²) complex located in the center of Salt Lake City, Utah, owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormon or LDS Church). In recent years, the usage of the name has gradually changed to include several other church facilities immediately adjacent to Temple Square. Contained within Temple Square proper are the Salt Lake Temple, Salt Lake Tabernacle, Salt Lake Assembly Hall, the Seagull Monument and two visitors' centers.
34. Rainbow Row in Charleston SOUTH CAROLINA
#34
Rainbow Row is the name for a series of colorful historic houses in Charleston, South Carolina. The houses are located north of Tradd St. and south of Elliot St. on East Bay Street. It is referred to as Rainbow Row for the pastel colors used to paint all of the houses. It is a common tourist attraction and is one of the most photographed parts of Charleston.
35. Cape Hatteras Light NORTH CAROLINA
#35
Cape Hatteras Light is a lighthouse located on Hatteras Island in the Outer Banks of North Carolina near the community of Buxton, and is part of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The Outer Banks are a group of islands on the North Carolina coast that separate the Atlantic Ocean from the coastal sounds and inlets. Atlantic currents in this area made for excellent travel for ships, except in the area of Diamond Shoals, just offshore at Cape Hatteras.
36. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art MISSOURI
#36
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art is an art museum in Kansas City, Missouri, known for its neo-classical architecture and extensive collection of Asian art. In 2007, Time magazine ranked the museum's new Bloch Building, # 1 on its list of "The 10 Best (New and Upcoming) Architectural Marvels" which considered candidates from around the globe.
37. 'The Bean' at Chicago's Millennium Park ILLINOIS
#37
Cloud Gate, a public sculpture by Indian-born British artist Anish Kapoor, is the centerpiece of the AT&T Plaza in Millennium Park within the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois, United States. Constructed between 2004 and 2006, the sculpture is nicknamed "The Bean" because of its bean-like shape.
38. The Parthenon in Nashville TENNESSEE
#38
The Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee is a full-scale replica of the original Parthenon in Athens. It was built in 1897 as part of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition.
39. The Crazy Horse Memorial SOUTH DAKOTA
#39
The Crazy Horse Memorial is a mountain monument under construction in the Black Hills of South Dakota, in the form of Crazy Horse, an Oglala Lakota warrior, riding a horse and pointing into the distance. The memorial was commissioned by Lakota Chief Henry Standing Bear to be sculpted by Korczak Ziolkowski. The memorial consists of the mountain carving (monument), the Indian Museum of North America, and the Native American Cultural Center.
40. The Cooper Union NEW YORK
#40
The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, commonly referred to simply as Cooper Union, is a privately funded college in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, United States, located at Cooper Square and Astor Place (Third Avenue and 6th–9th Streets).
41. Antietam National Battlefield MARYLAND
#41
Antietam National Battlefield is a National Park Service protected area along Antietam Creek in Sharpsburg, Maryland which commemorates the American Civil War Battle of Antietam that occurred on September 17, 1862. The area, situated on fields among the Appalachian foothills near the Potomac River, features the battlefield site and visitor center, a national military cemetery and a field hospital museum. Today, over 330,000 people visit the park each year.
42. The Haʻikū Stairs HAWAII
#42
The Ha'iku Stairs, also known as the Stairway to Heaven or Ha?iku Ladder, is a steep hiking trail on the island of O?ahu. The trail began as a wooden ladder spiked to the cliff on the south side of the Ha?iku Valley. It was installed in 1942 to enable antenna cables to be strung from one side of the cliffs above Ha?iku Valley to the other. A building to provide a continuous communication link between Wahiawa and Ha?iku Valley Naval Radio Station was constructed at the peak of Pu?ukeahiakahoe, elevation about 2,800 feet.
43. The cathedral of St. John the Baptist GEORGIA
#43
The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist is a Roman Catholic cathedral at 222 East Harris Street, Savannah, Georgia, in the United States. It is the Mother Church of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Savannah.
44. The Staten Island Ferry NEW YORK
#44
The Staten Island Ferry is a passenger ferry service operated by the New York City Department of Transportation that runs between Manhattan Island and Staten Island. The ferry departs Manhattan from South Ferry, Peter Minuit Plaza, at the southernmost tip of Manhattan near Battery Park. On Staten Island, the ferry arrives and departs from St. George Ferry Terminal on Richmond Terrace, near Richmond County Borough Hall and Richmond County Supreme Court.
45. The Texas School Book Depository in Dallas TEXAS
#45
The Texas School Book Depository (now the Dallas County Administration Building) is the former name of a seven-floor building facing Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas. Located on the northwest corner of Elm and North Houston Streets, at the western end of downtown Dallas, its address is 411 Elm Street. The building is notable for its connection to the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy.
46. TCL Chinese Theatre CALIFORNIA
#46
Grauman's Chinese Theatre is a movie theater located at 6925 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood. It is located along the historic Hollywood Walk of Fame. The Chinese Theatre was commissioned following the success of the nearby Grauman's Egyptian Theatre which opened in 1922. Built over 18 months, beginning in January 1926 by a partnership headed by Sid Grauman, the theater opened May 18, 1927 with the premiere of Cecil B. DeMille's film The King of Kings.
47. Helen Keller's Home ALABAMA
#47
Ivy Green is the birthplace of Helen Keller and is the place where her advocacy for persons with disability believed to have started. The white wooden home was constructed in 1820, a design typical to houses in Southern states. A room inside the house is arranged to serve as a museum that showcases Helen Keller?s personal belongings and memorabilia. It includes her Braille typewriter and books, gifts, letters, pictures, and some of the things that a famous close friend known as Alexander Graham Bell gave to her as gifts. Ivy Green was included in the list of National Register of Historic Places in 1954. Since then, it has become a memorial to the incredible phenomenon that happened to the seven year old young Helen. Every year, Ivy Green hosts the Helen Keller Festival that happens in June, which is also the birth month of Helen.
48. Carhenge NEBRASKA
#48
Carhenge is a replica of England's Stonehenge located near the city of Alliance, Nebraska on the High Plains. Instead of being built with large standing stones, as is the case with the original Stonehenge, Carhenge is formed from vintage American automobiles, all covered with gray spray paint. Built by Jim Reinders, it was dedicated at the June 1987 summer solstice. In 2006, a visitor center was constructed to service the site.
RELATED GOALS:
49. Biloxi Light MISSISSIPPI
#49
Biloxi Light is a lighthouse in Biloxi, Mississippi, adjacent to the Mississippi Sound of the Gulf of Mexico. The lighthouse has been kept by female keepers for more years than any other lighthouse in the United States. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973 and declared a Mississippi Landmark in 1987.
50. The Navesink Twin Lights NEW JERSEY
#50
The Navesink Twin Lights is a non-operational lighthouse and museum located in Highlands, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States, overlooking Sandy Hook Bay, the entrance to the New York Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean. The Twin Lights, as the name implies, are a pair of beacons located 246 feet (75 m) above sea level on the headlands of the Navesink Highlands.